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Breaks

 
Antics Christmas Party




A hip hop, breaks and funk jam!
DJs: DJ Antics and DJ Beats

Swap your mince pies, sausage rolls and sherry for hip-hop, funk, breaks and electro. It?s a Christmas rave up here tonight as residents DJ Antics and DJ Beats plus special guests will be offering up the finest hip hop, funk breaks and beats, while the Antics' crew delight your eyes with their awesome visuals. And there's drinks deals, oh yes: check www.anticsclub.com for details. Tickets are only £5 in advance via anticsclub.com. Check out the Antics mix at http://soundcloud.com/antics-2/antics-promo-mix

£5 via http://www.anticsclub.com




Starts:
Saturday 20th December, 2014 @ 10:00 PM


Location:

Koko, 1a Camden High Street, Camden, 7JE






Antics




A hip hop, breaks and funk jam!
DJs: DJ Antics and DJ Beats

Get your dancing shoes on, Antics is returning for another Saturday night mash up of hip-hop, funk, breaks and electro. Residents DJ Antics and DJ Beats plus special guests will be offering up the finest hip hop, funk breaks and beats, while the Antics' crew delight your eyes with their awesome visuals. And there's drinks deals, oh yes: check www.anticsclub.com for details. Tickets are only £5 in advance via anticsclub.com. Check out the Antics mix at http://soundcloud.com/antics-2/antics-promo-mix

£5 via http://www.anticsclub.com




Starts:
Saturday 11th October, 2014 @ 10:00 PM


Location:

Koko, 1a Camden High Street, Camden, 7JE






Antics




A hip hop, breaks and funk jam!
DJs: DJ Woody, DJ Antics and DJ Beats

After several rammed parties at KOKO, Antics is returning for another Saturday night mash up of hip-hop, funk, breaks and electro. Residents DJ Antics and DJ Beats plus a special DJ/AV set from DJ Woody will be offering up the finest hip hop, funk breaks and beats, while the Antics' crew delight your eyes with their awesome visuals. And there's drinks deals, oh yes: check www.anticsclub.com for details. Tickets are only £5 in advance via anticsclub.com. Check out the Antics mix at http://soundcloud.com/antics-2/antics-promo-mix

£5 via http://www.anticsclub.com




Starts:
Saturday 20th September, 2014 @ 10:00 PM


Location:

Koko, 1a Camden High Street, Camden, 7JE






Mike Rivers

via Rec.audio.pro

1 month ago
Re: Prism Lyra 1 USB Audio Interface Review Posted
On 8/15/2014 2:44 PM, Jay Ts wrote:> In terms of the circuit and performance, if you can get the printing on> the main chips, such as the codec, it can help identify the exact part.> From there, it's possible to look up the corresponding datasheet and> learn a lot about the quality of the product.I could read it with difficulty, and I put the info about the codecs in the review because I knew that some people were going to want to compare what's used in this unit with what's used in some other unit, then start a discussion on Gearslutz along the lines of "The $2,000 Lyra uses the same converters as the $200 M-Audio (OK, I don't know if that's true but you get the point) so why is it so much more expensive?> It's nice to see the brands of electrolytic caps in the power supply> section, too.In order to do that on this unit I would have had to disassemble it even further since the power supply, except for some vent slots, was pretty thoroughly enclosed. I wouldn't expect a company like Prism would use cheap components.> if the caps are Nichicon, United Chemi-con or Panasonic, just tell> people.I've heard of those brands and if I notice them, I might mention them. There was very little on the main board that's identifiable. I don't know how to tell which of those little rectangular chips are resistors and which are capacitors, much less the brand names.> In general for SMD chips, there are footprints that are so tiny that> virtually no human can solder them, but there are also older, larger> footprints (such TSSOP) that are just half of the 0.1" through-hole> packages from the 1970s that we all love. :)What part of "it's practically unrepairable" don't you understand? Do I have to prove this to you? You're reading my review. Take my word for it. If it was easy to repair, I would have mentioned that.> From what I'm seeing in the photos in the article, the first thing you> need to to is use brighter lighting so the light level on the case more> closely matches the brightness of the LED display. The LEDs are simply> overexposed, which will mess up the colors.Tell that to Prism. I'd have to look at the review again, but I think that all of the pictures were either screen shots or came from Prism's "high resolution" press photo library. The reason why I tried to photograph the meters myself was that I wasn't satisfied with the stock Prism photos. You DID read the review, didn't you?> It's not always necessary to have an exact schematic or understand the> circuit completely. Often, designs are based on reference designs they> got from the manufacturer. I repaired my DMP3 just from looking at the> circuit board and discerning how the circuit generally worked, looking at> the INA163 datasheet, probing some pins to see that something was wrong,> and making a logical guess. It was easy.OK, you can try fixing your Lyra when you get one and it breaks. Most people who get into a failed device will look for a blown fuse or a charred resistor. I can trace analog signals, but when it comes to logic beyond simple gates, there's really nothing I can do to figure out what's wrong. If your problem is with an op amp, yeah, that's not difficult assuming you can remove the bad one and replace it without buggering up the board.> If there are no custom proprietary chips, and you can identify all> of the chips, and look them up on Mouser or Digi-Key and order in> quantity of one, that's a big plus!This ain't no $200 mic preamp.I'm not really writing reviews for repair technicians who fix things when they break, I'm writing for people who are going to use them and hope that they don't break. To be honest, I'd take a crack at a mic preamp that quit working, even if it was mostly SMD construction, but I know my limits. I have a small Mackie mixer, a 402 VLZ3 I think, that has a dead headphone amplifier. The way it's packaged, it needs to be completely disassembled to even see the component side of the board, and the chips are really packed closely together. I wouldn't take a chance on screwing something else up trying to repair it. And for sure I'm not going to get my soldering iron close to a $2,000 interface with a lot of digital stuff on it. I might tackle the power supply if that was clearly the point of failure (which isn't too difficult to determine) and it was Sunday and I needed it for a session that night. But I've got good sense and I'd send it back to the company for repair.> Look up "soldering smd" on YouTube. There are some really good lessons.Yeah, like I'm going to trust myself to work on an expensive piece like this with what I learned from YouTube? Nope. I have some ChipQuik and have used that to remove a part and replace it when I could get in to work on it, but I only chanced working on something I cared about after removing and replacing a bunch of surface mount parts on a PC graphics board that I picked out of someone's Free Stuff pile at a hamfest, just to have something to practice on.Look, Jay, I write these reviews because it gives an opportunity to play with stuff that I wouldn't buy (either it's too expensive or I don't need it) and I share them with those who are interested for all the fame and glory that it gets me. It doesn't get me any money. If you've like me to further into the design and construction, I'll be happy to give you a quote. You have some valid questions, but you're very different from the user for whom this gear was designed.An Ampex AG-440 was designed for a different kind of user and was built to be serviced (and in fact there are full schematics in the manual) because every recording studio and broadcast station had a tech on board or on call. This is not the case with today's studio gear, even units such as the Lyra, that would be comfortably at home in any top tier studio today. They just don't make studio techs any more like they did in the Ampex days - because they don't make gear that way any more.-- For a good time, visit http://mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com


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