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2 weeks ago
Counting down to Web Directions ’14: Today’s classic video
Web Directions 2014 , our 10th anniversary edition, is less than a month away. With the best lineup ever, a brand new venue, along with some amazing partners? bringing you the World?s Best Conference Coffee (courtesy of Sample Coffee Company , our coffee of choice here at Web Directions), a fantastic free Juice bar, not to mention the chance to get up close and personal with a Tesla Model S?it?s an event you won?t want to miss. Truly. So if you?ve not signed up yet, why not do so now? Discounted tickets are available ?til Friday Oct. 10 .

Meanwhile, to get you excited in the lead up, we?ll be highlighting some of our favourite (and some of the most popular), presentations from the last few years.

We?ll kick off with one of our most popular ever, from just last year, featuring Pasquale D?Silva on designing with animation.

As our user experiences become increasingly dynamic, we have a great deal to learn from those who?ve been bringing static images to life for a century or more, animators. Pasquale, himself an amazing animator, looks at the lessons we can learn from cartoons and animation, with some fantastic examples of what works (and what doesn?t). Rightly one of our most popular videos ever, enjoy ?Stiff and Static Sucks?Designing with Animation? by Pasquale D?Silva.

The post Counting down to Web Directions ?14: Today?s classic video appeared first on Web Directions .


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Well worth a listen......

Cassetteboy - Cameron's Conference Rap
Contains swearing. Seriously though Dave, thanks for legalising parody videos. Lyrics I'm hardcore and I know the score And I am disgusted by the poor And my...

Image/photo  


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Message à la Conférence internationale de soutien à la Guerre populaire en Inde / Message to the International Conference in Support of the People's War in India / Messaggio alla conferenza internazionale di sostegno alla guerra popolare in India #LutteDesClasses http://www.vp-partisan.org/article1324.html


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Author of PulseAudio, SystemD now targets Package Managers and Bootloaders
wrote the following post:

Revisiting How We Put Together Linux Systems
Image/photo

In a previous blog story I discussedFactory Reset, Stateless Systems, Reproducible Systems & Verifiable Systems, I now want to take the opportunity to explain a bit where we want to take this withsystemd in the longer run, and what we want to build out of it. This is going to be a longer story, so better grab a cold bottle ofClub Mate before you start reading.

Traditional Linux distributions are built around packaging systems like RPM or dpkg, and an organization model where upstream developers and downstream packagers are relatively clearly separated: an upstream developer writes code, and puts it somewhere online, in a tarball. A packager than grabs it and turns it into RPMs/DEBs. The user then grabs these RPMs/DEBs and installs them locally on the system. For a variety of uses this is a fantastic scheme: users have a large selection of readily packaged software available, in mostly uniform packaging, from a single source they can trust. In this scheme the distribution vets all software it packages, and as long as the user trusts the distribution all should be good. The distribution takes the responsibility of ensuring the software is not malicious, of timely fixing security problems and helping the user if something is wrong.

Upstream Projects
However, this scheme also has a number of problems, and doesn't fit many use-cases of our software particularly well. Let's have a look at the problems of this scheme for many upstreams:





      Upstream software vendors are fully dependent on downstream distributions to package their stuff. It's the downstream distribution that decides on schedules, packaging details, and how to handle support. Often upstream vendors want much faster release cycles then the downstream distributions follow.




      Realistic testing is extremely unreliable and next to impossible. Since the end-user can run a variety of different package versions together, and expects the software he runs to just work on any combination, the test matrix explodes. If upstream tests its version on distribution X release Y, then there's no guarantee that that's the precise combination of packages that the end user will eventually run. In fact, it is very unlikely that the end user will, since most distributions probably updated a number of libraries the package relies on by the time the package ends up being made available to the user. The fact that each package can be individually updated by the user, and each user can combine library versions, plug-ins and executables relatively freely, results in a high risk of something going wrong.




      Since there are so many different distributions in so many different versions around, if upstream tries to build and test software for them it needs to do so for a large number of distributions, which is a massive effort.




      The distributions are actually quite different in many ways. In fact, they are different in a lot of the most basic functionality. For example, the path where to put x86-64 libraries is different on Fedora and Debian derived systems..




      Developing software for a number of distributions and versions is hard: if you want to do it, you need to actually install them, each one of them, manually, and then build your software for each.



    Since most downstream distributions have strict licensing and trademark requirements (and rightly so), any kind of closed source software (or otherwise non-free) does not fit into this scheme at all.

This all together makes it really hard for many upstreams to work nicely with the current way how Linux works. Often they try to improve the situation for them, for example by bundling libraries, to make their test and build matrices smaller.

System Vendors
The toolbox approach of classic Linux distributions is fantastic for people who want to put together their individual system, nicely adjusted to exactly what they need. However, this is not really how many of today's Linux systems are built, installed or updated. If you build any kind of embedded device, a server system, or even user systems, you frequently do you work based on complete system images, that are linearly versioned. You build these images somewhere, and then you replicate them atomically to a larger number of systems. On these systems, you don't install or remove packages, you get a defined set of files, and besides installing or updating the system there are no ways how to change the set of tools you get.

The current Linux distributions are not particularly good at providing for this major use-case of Linux. Their strict focus on individual packages as well as package managers as end-user install and update tool is incompatible with what many system vendors want.

Users
The classic Linux distribution scheme is frequently not what end users want, either. Many users are used to app markets like Android, Windows or iOS/Mac have. Markets are a platform that doesn't package, build or maintain software like distributions do, but simply allows users to quickly find and download the software they need, with the app vendor responsible for keeping the app updated, secured, and all that on the vendor's release cycle. Users tend to be impatient. They want their software quickly, and the fine distinction between trusting a single distribution or a myriad of app developers individually is usually not important for them. The companies behind the marketplaces usually try to improve this trust problem by providing sand-boxing technologies: as a replacement for the distribution that audits, vets, builds and packages the software and thus allows users to trust it to a certain level, these vendors try to find technical solutions to ensure that the software they offer for download can't be malicious.

Existing Approaches To Fix These Problems
Now, all the issues pointed out above are not new, and there are sometimes quite successful attempts to do something about it. Ubuntu Apps, Docker, Software Collections, ChromeOS, CoreOS all fix part of this problem set, usually with a strict focus on one facet of Linux systems. For example, Ubuntu Apps focus strictly on end user (desktop) applications, and don't care about how we built/update/install the OS itself, or containers. Docker OTOH focuses on containers only, and doesn't care about end-user apps. Software Collections tries to focus on the development environments. ChromeOS focuses on the OS itself, but only for end-user devices. CoreOS also focuses on the OS, but only for server systems.

The approaches they find are usually good at specific things, and use a variety of different technologies, on different layers. However, none of these projects tried to fix this problems in a generic way, for all uses, right in the core components of the OS itself.

Linux has come to tremendous successes because its kernel is so generic: you can build supercomputers and tiny embedded devices out of it. It's time we come up with a basic, reusable scheme how to solve the problem set described above, that is equally generic.

What We Want
The systemd cabal (Kay Sievers, Harald Hoyer, Daniel Mack, Tom Gundersen, David Herrmann, and yours truly) recently met in Berlin about all these things, and tried to come up with a scheme that is somewhat simple, but tries to solve the issues generically, for all use-cases, as part of the systemd project. All that in a way that is somewhat compatible with the current scheme of distributions, to allow a slow, gradual adoption. Also, and that's something one cannot stress enough: the toolbox scheme of classic Linux distributions is actually a good one, and for many cases the right one. However, we need to make sure we make distributions relevant again for alluse-cases, not just those of highly individualized systems.

Anyway, so let's summarize what we are trying to do:





      We want an efficient way that allows vendors to package their software (regardless if just an app, or the whole OS) directly for the end user, and know the precise combination of libraries and packages it will operate with.




      We want to allow end users and administrators to install these packages on their systems, regardless which distribution they have installed on it.




      We want a unified solution that ultimately can cover updates for full systems, OS containers, end user apps, programming ABIs, and more. These updates shall be double-buffered, (at least). This is an absolute necessity if we want to prepare the ground for operating systems that manage themselves, that can update safely without administrator involvement.



    We want our images to be trustable (i.e. signed). In fact we want a fully trustable OS, with images that can be verified by a full trust chain from the firmware (EFI SecureBoot!), through the boot loader, through the kernel, and initrd. Cryptographically secure verification of the code we execute is relevant on the desktop (like ChromeOS does), but also for apps, for embedded devices and even on servers (in a post-Snowden world, in particular).

What We Propose
So much about the set of problems, and what we are trying to do. So, now, let's discuss the technical bits we came up with:

The scheme we propose is built around the variety of concepts of btrfs and Linux file system name-spacing. btrfs at this point already has a large number of features that fit neatly in our concept, and the maintainers are busy working on a couple of others we want to eventually make use of.

As first part of our proposal we make heavy use of btrfs sub-volumes and introduce a clear naming scheme for them. We name snapshots like this:




usr:::

      -- This refers to a full vendor operating system tree. It's basically a /usr tree (and no other directories), in a specific version, with everything you need to boot it up inside it. The




      field is replaced by some vendor identifier, maybe a scheme like


org.fedoraproject.FedoraWorkstation

      . The




      field specifies a CPU architecture the OS is designed for, for example


x86-64

      . The




      field specifies a specific OS version, for example


23.4

      . An example sub-volume name could hence look like this:


usr:org.fedoraproject.FedoraWorkstation:x86_64:23.4




root:::

      -- This refers to an


instance

      of an operating system. Its basically a root directory, containing primarily /etc and /var (but possibly more). Sub-volumes of this type do not contain a populated /usr tree though. The




      field refers to some instance name (maybe the host name of the instance). The other fields are defined as above. An example sub-volume name is


root:revolution:org.fedoraproject.FedoraWorkstation:x86_64

      .



runtime:::

      -- This refers to a vendor


runtime

      . A runtime here is supposed to be a set of libraries and other resources that are needed to run apps (for the concept of


apps

      see below), all in a /usr tree. In this regard this is very similar to the


usr

      sub-volumes explained above, however, while a


usr

      sub-volume is a full OS and contains everything necessary to boot, a runtime is really only a set of libraries. You cannot boot it, but you can run apps with it. An example sub-volume name is:


runtime:org.gnome.GNOME3_20:3.20.1




framework:::

      -- This is very similar to a vendor runtime, as described above, it contains just a /usr tree, but goes one step further: it additionally contains all development headers, compilers and build tools, that allow developing against a specific runtime. For each runtime there should be a framework. When you develop against a specific framework in a specific architecture, then the resulting app will be compatible with the runtime of the same vendor ID and architecture. Example:


framework:org.gnome.GNOME3_20:3.20.1




app::::

      -- This encapsulates an application bundle. It contains a tree that at runtime is mounted to


/opt/

      , and contains all the application's resources. The




      could be a string like


org.libreoffice.LibreOffice

      , the




      refers to one the vendor id of one specific runtime the application is built for, for example


org.gnome.GNOME3_20:3.20.1

      . The




      and




      refer to the architecture the application is built for, and of course its version. Example:


app:org.libreoffice.LibreOffice:GNOME3_20:x86_64:133




home:::

      -- This sub-volume shall refer to the home directory of the specific user. The




      field contains the user name, the




      and




      fields the numeric Unix UIDs and GIDs of the user. The idea here is that in the long run the list of sub-volumes is sufficient as a user database (but see below). Example:


home:lennart:1000:1000
    .

btrfs partitions that adhere to this naming scheme should be clearly identifiable. It is our intention to introduce a new GPT partition type ID for this.

How To Use It
After we introduced this naming scheme let's see what we can build of this:





      When booting up a system we mount the root directory from one of the


root

      sub-volumes, and then mount /usr from a matching


usr

      sub-volume.


Matching

      here means it carries the same




      and




      . Of course, by default we should pick the matching


usr

      sub-volume with the newest version by default.




      When we boot up an OS container, we do exactly the same as the when we boot up a regular system: we simply combine a


usr

      sub-volume with a


root

      sub-volume.




      When we enumerate the system's users we simply go through the list of


home

      snapshots.




      When a user authenticates and logs in we mount his home directory from his snapshot.




      When an app is run, we set up a new file system name-space, mount the


app

      sub-volume to


/opt//

      , and the appropriate


runtime

      sub-volume the app picked to


/usr

      , as well as the user's


/home/$USER

      to its place.




      When a developer wants to develop against a specific runtime he installs the right framework, and then temporarily transitions into a name space where


/usr

      is mounted from the framework sub-volume, and


/home/$USER
    from his own home directory. In this name space he then runs his build commands. He can build in multiple name spaces at the same time, if he intends to builds software for multiple runtimes or architectures at the same time.

Instantiating a new system or OS container (which is exactly the same in this scheme) just consists of creating a new appropriately namedroot sub-volume. Completely naturally you can share one vendor OS copy in one specific version with a multitude of container instances.

Everything is double-buffered (or actually, n-ary-buffered), becauseusr, runtime, framework, app sub-volumes can exist in multiple versions. Of course, by default the execution logic should always pick the newest release of each sub-volume, but it is up to the user keep multiple versions around, and possibly execute older versions, if he desires to do so. In fact, like on ChromeOS this could even be handled automatically: if a system fails to boot with a newer snapshot, the boot loader can automatically revert back to an older version of the OS.

An Example
Note that in result this allows installing not only multiple end-user applications into the same btrfs volume, but also multiple operating systems, multiple system instances, multiple runtimes, multiple frameworks. Or to spell this out in an example:

Let's say Fedora, Mandriva and ArchLinux all implement this scheme, and provide ready-made end-user images. Also, the GNOME, KDE, SDL projects all define a runtime+framework to develop against. Finally, both LibreOffice and Firefox provide their stuff according to this scheme. You can now trivially install of these into the same btrfs volume:
  • usr:org.fedoraproject.WorkStation:x86_64:24.7
  • usr:org.fedoraproject.WorkStation:x86_64:24.8
  • usr:org.fedoraproject.WorkStation:x86_64:24.9
  • usr:org.fedoraproject.WorkStation:x86_64:25beta
  • usr:com.mandriva.Client:i386:39.3
  • usr:com.mandriva.Client:i386:39.4
  • usr:com.mandriva.Client:i386:39.6
  • usr:org.archlinux.Desktop:x86_64:302.7.8
  • usr:org.archlinux.Desktop:x86_64:302.7.9
  • usr:org.archlinux.Desktop:x86_64:302.7.10
  • root:revolution:org.fedoraproject.WorkStation:x86_64
  • root:testmachine:org.fedoraproject.WorkStation:x86_64
  • root:foo:com.mandriva.Client:i386
  • root:bar:org.archlinux.Desktop:x86_64
  • runtime:org.gnome.GNOME3_20:3.20.1
  • runtime:org.gnome.GNOME3_20:3.20.4
  • runtime:org.gnome.GNOME3_20:3.20.5
  • runtime:org.gnome.GNOME3_22:3.22.0
  • runtime:org.kde.KDE5_6:5.6.0
  • framework:org.gnome.GNOME3_22:3.22.0
  • framework:org.kde.KDE5_6:5.6.0
  • app:org.libreoffice.LibreOffice:GNOME3_20:x86_64:133
  • app:org.libreoffice.LibreOffice:GNOME3_22:x86_64:166
  • app:org.mozilla.Firefox:GNOME3_20:x86_64:39
  • app:org.mozilla.Firefox:GNOME3_20:x86_64:40
  • home:lennart:1000:1000
  • home:hrundivbakshi:1001:1001

In the example above, we have three vendor operating systems installed. All of them in three versions, and one even in a beta version. We have four system instances around. Two of them of Fedora, maybe one of them we usually boot from, the other we run for very specific purposes in an OS container. We also have the runtimes for two GNOME releases in multiple versions, plus one for KDE. Then, we have the development trees for one version of KDE and GNOME around, as well as two apps, that make use of two releases of the GNOME runtime. Finally, we have the home directories of two users.

Now, with the name-spacing concepts we introduced above, we can actually relatively freely mix and match apps and OSes, or develop against specific frameworks in specific versions on any operating system. It doesn't matter if you booted your ArchLinux instance, or your Fedora one, you can execute both LibreOffice and Firefox just fine, because at execution time they get matched up with the right runtime, and all of them are available from all the operating systems you installed. You get the precise runtime that the upstream vendor of Firefox/LibreOffice did their testing with. It doesn't matter anymore which distribution you run, and which distribution the vendor prefers.

Also, given that the user database is actually encoded in the sub-volume list, it doesn't matter which system you boot, the distribution should be able to find your local users automatically, without any configuration in /etc/passwd.

Building Blocks
With this naming scheme plus the way how we can combine them on execution we already came quite far, but how do we actually get these sub-volumes onto the final machines, and how do we update them? Well, btrfs has a feature they call "send-and-receive". It basically allows you do "diff" two file system versions, and generate a binary delta. You can generate these deltas on a developer's machine and then push them into the user's system, and he'll get the exact same sub-volume too. This is how we envision installation and updating of operating systems, applications, runtimes, frameworks. At installation time, we simply deserialize an initial send-and-receive delta into our btrfs volume, and later, when a new version is released we just add in the few bits that are new, by dropping in another send-and-receive delta under a new sub-volume name. And we do it exactly the same for the OS itself, for a runtime, a framework or an app. There's no technical distinction anymore. The underlying operation for installing apps, runtime, frameworks, vendor OSes, as well as the operation for updating them is done the exact same way for all.

Of course, keeping multiple full /usr trees around sounds like an awful lot of waste, after all they will contain a lot of very similar data, since a lot of resources are shared between distributions, frameworks and runtimes. However, thankfully btrfs actually is able to de-duplicate this for us. If we add in a new app snapshot, this simply adds in the new files that changed. Moreover different runtimes and operating systems might actually end up sharing the same tree.

Even though the example above focuses primarily on the end-user, desktop side of things, the concept is also extremely powerful in server scenarios. For example, it is easy to build your own usrtrees and deliver them to your hosts using this scheme. The usrsub-volumes are supposed to be something that administrators can put together. After deserializing them into a couple of hosts, you can trivially instantiate them as OS containers there, simply by adding a new root sub-volume for each instance, referencing the usr tree you just put together. Instantiating OS containers hence becomes as easy as creating a new btrfs sub-volume. And you can still update the images nicely, get fully double-buffered updates and everything.

And of course, this scheme also applies great to embedded use-cases. Regardless if you build a TV, an IVI system or a phone: you can put together you OS versions as usr trees, and then use btrfs-send-and-receive facilities to deliver them to the systems, and update them there.

Many people when they hear the word "btrfs" instantly reply with "is it ready yet?". Thankfully, most of the functionality we really need here is strictly read-only. With the exception of the homesub-volumes (see below) all snapshots are strictly read-only, and are delivered as immutable vendor trees onto the devices. They never are changed. Even if btrfs might still be immature, for this kind of read-only logic it should be more than good enough.

Note that this scheme also enables doing fat systems: for example, an installer image could include a Fedora version compiled for x86-64, one for i386, one for ARM, all in the same btrfs volume. Due to btrfs' de-duplication they will share as much as possible, and when the image is booted up the right sub-volume is automatically picked. Something similar of course applies to the apps too!

This also allows us to implement something that we like to callOperating-System-As-A-Virus. Installing a new system is little more than:

    • Creating a new GPT partition table
    • Adding an EFI System Partition (FAT) to it
    • Adding a new btrfs volume to it
    • Deserializing a single


usr
    sub-volume into the btrfs volume
  • Installing a boot loader
  • Rebooting

Now, since the only real vendor data you need is the usr sub-volume, you can trivially duplicate this onto any block device you want. Let's say you are a happy Fedora user, and you want to provide a friend with his own installation of this awesome system, all on a USB stick. All you have to do for this is do the steps above, using your installedusr tree as source to copy. And there you go! And you don't have to be afraid that any of your personal data is copied too, as the usrsub-volume is the exact version your vendor provided you with. Or with other words: there's no distinction anymore between installer images and installed systems. It's all the same. Installation becomes replication, not more. Live-CDs and installed systems can be fully identical.

Note that in this design apps are actually developed against a single, very specific runtime, that contains all libraries it can link against (including a specific glibc version!). Any library that is not included in the runtime the developer picked must be included in the app itself. This is similar how apps on Android declare one very specific Android version they are developed against. This greatly simplifies application installation, as there's no dependency hell: each app pulls in one runtime, and the app is actually free to pick which one, as you can have multiple installed, though only one is used by each app.

Also note that operating systems built this way will never see "half-updated" systems, as it is common when a system is updated using RPM/dpkg. When updating the system the code will either run the old or the new version, but it will never see part of the old files and part of the new files. This is the same for apps, runtimes, and frameworks, too.

Where We Are Now
We are currently working on a lot of the groundwork necessary for this. This scheme relies on the ability to monopolize the vendor OS resources in /usr, which is the key of what I described inFactory Reset, Stateless Systems, Reproducible Systems & Verifiable Systemsa few weeks back. Then, of course, for the full desktop app concept we need a strong sandbox, that does more than just hiding files from the file system view. After all with an app concept like the above the primary interfacing between the executed desktop apps and the rest of the system is via IPC (which is why we work on kdbus and teach it all kinds of sand-boxing features), and the kernel itself. Harald Hoyer has started working on generating the btrfs send-and-receive images based on Fedora.

Getting to the full scheme will take a while. Currently we have many of the building blocks ready, but some major items are missing. For example, we push quite a few problems into btrfs, that other solutions try to solve in user space. One of them is actually signing/verification of images. The btrfs maintainers are working on adding this to the code base, but currently nothing exists. This functionality is essential though to come to a fully verified system where a trust chain exists all the way from the firmware to the apps. Also, to make the home sub-volume scheme fully workable we actually need encrypted sub-volumes, so that the sub-volume's pass-phrase can be used for authenticating users in PAM. This doesn't exist either.

Working towards this scheme is a gradual process. Many of the steps we require for this are useful outside of the grand scheme though, which means we can slowly work towards the goal, and our users can already take benefit of what we are working on as we go.

Also, and most importantly, this is not really a departure from traditional operating systems:

Each app, each OS and each app sees a traditional Unix hierarchy with /usr, /home, /opt, /var, /etc. It executes in an environment that is pretty much identical to how it would be run on traditional systems.

There's no need to fully move to a system that uses only btrfs and follows strictly this sub-volume scheme. For example, we intend to provide implicit support for systems that are installed on ext4 or xfs, or that are put together with traditional packaging tools such as RPM or dpkg: if the the user tries to install a runtime/app/framework/os image on a system that doesn't use btrfs so far, it can just create a loop-back btrfs image in /var, and push the data into that. Even us developers will run our stuff like this for a while, after all this new scheme is not particularly useful for highly individualized systems, and we developers usually tend to run systems like that.

Also note that this in no way a departure from packaging systems like RPM or DEB. Even if the new scheme we propose is used for installing and updating a specific system, it is RPM/DEB that is used to put together the vendor OS tree initially. Hence, even in this scheme RPM/DEB are highly relevant, though not strictly as an end-user tool anymore, but as a build tool.

So Let's Summarize Again What We Propose





      We want a unified scheme, how we can install and update OS images, user apps, runtimes and frameworks.




      We want a unified scheme how you can relatively freely mix OS images, apps, runtimes and frameworks on the same system.




      We want a fully trusted system, where cryptographic verification of all executed code can be done, all the way to the firmware, as standard feature of the system.




      We want to allow app vendors to write their programs against very specific frameworks, under the knowledge that they will end up being executed with the exact same set of libraries chosen.




      We want to allow parallel installation of multiple OSes and versions of them, multiple runtimes in multiple versions, as well as multiple frameworks in multiple versions. And of course, multiple apps in multiple versions.




      We want everything


double buffered

      (or actual n-ary buffered), to ensure we can reliably update/rollback versions, in particular to safely do automatic updates.




      We want a system where updating a runtime, OS, framework, or OS container is as simple as adding in a new snapshot and restarting the runtime/OS/framework/OS container.




      We want a system where we can easily instantiate a number of OS instances from a single vendor tree, with zero difference for doing this on order to be able to boot it on bare metal/VM or as a container.



    We want to enable Linux to have an open scheme that people can use to build app markets and similar schemes, not restricted to a specific vendor.

Final Words
I'll be talking about this at LinuxCon Europe in October. I originally intended to discuss this at the Linux Plumbers Conference (which I assumed was the right forum for this kind of major plumbing level improvement), and at linux.conf.au, but there was no interest in my session submissions there...

Of course this is all work in progress. These are our current ideas we are working towards. As we progress we will likely change a number of things. For example, the precise naming of the sub-volumes might look very different in the end.

Of course, we are developers of the systemd project. Implementing this scheme is not just a job for the systemd developers. This is a reinvention how distributions work, and hence needs great support from the distributions. We really hope we can trigger some interest by publishing this proposal now, to get the distributions on board. This after all is explicitly not supposed to be a solution for one specific project and one specific vendor project, we care about making this open, and solving it for the generic case, without cutting corners.

If you have any questions about this, you know how you can reach us (IRC, mail, G+, ...).

The future is going to be awesome!


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The Dunwells at Leeds




Leeds rock heroes The Dunwells are hitting the road this September for a spectacular 13-date tour.
Live: Dunwells

2014 is shaping up to be an exciting year for The Dunwells, with the upcoming release of their second studio album.

The band have been putting down new tracks with producer Stephen Harris (Kodaline, Kaiser Chiefs, Dave Matthews) since late last year, and are now looking forward to playing a slew of dates both in the US and the UK.

Clearly they lead a rather exciting musical existence - and they've acquired a dedicated fan following along the way.

The Dunwells are brothers Joe and Dave Dunwell, along with cousins Jonny Lamb and Rob Clayton. Having spent their formative years playing around Leeds, and honing their chops in the clubs, their first big break came when they hit the shores of the US in 2011 to perform at the Folk Alliance Conference in Memphis, TN.

Their impact was nothing short of astounding, and led to the band being signed to Austin based indie Playing In Traffic. This, in turn, led to a co-deal with the respected sub major Concord Music Group (Paul McCartney, Valerie June, Alison Krauss).

The fairytale continued throughout 2012 and 2013, as The Dunwells' swift rise developed through endless touring, an appearance on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and appearances at major festivals in both the US (Lollapalooza, Austin City Limits, Bunbury) and the UK (Cropredy, HMV's Next Big Thing, The Great Escape).

The Dunwells create a unique blend of emotionally driven, anthemic rock, featuring signature four part harmonies for which they have become known.

Their appeal is widespread, with influences that range from Foy Vance and Crowded House, to Fleet Foxes and Elbow. The band is looking forward to the upcoming release, and sharing new music with their growing legion of fans.

11
Tickets




Starts:
Friday 5th September, 2014 @ 7:00 PM


Location:

The Wardrobe, 6 St. Peters Square, Quarry Hill, Leeds, West Yorkshire






Post
Fosters Comedy Live 3rd October




Eat, Drink, Laugh and Dance at Jongleurs Birmingham.
Live: Sam Avery, Larry Dean, Roger Monkhouse

Best arts and entertainment venue in Birmingham. Bar Risa and Jongleurs is a multi-functional entertainment venue consisting of 6 rooms and 7 bars, with a total capacity of 2400 people, making it one of the largest venues in Birmingham city. We offer a full range of entertainment, including Jongleurs comedy club with another 4 rooms, where you can relax at sunken tables in our Chill bar, dance to all that is retro in Rewind or hire your own stylish and sassy VIP area. We can cater for any event from company conferences to full party bookings; small and large groups can be accommodated with several rooms available to hire and private booths available in Rewind. We can provide anything from buffets to sit down dinners tailored to suit your budget and needs. The comedy is second to none and the venue provides a fantastic after party. Each week the club attracts thousands of people looking to make their night out just that little bit extra special. highlight runs every Friday and Saturday with an after party giving you access to the stylish bar located down stairs, Risa. The show can accommodate up to 400 guests each day. This is the flagship club and throughout the last 7 years has proven exactly why this is with numerous awards.

Car: Nearest Carpark is NCP on Broad Street Taxi: Hayleys Cars - 0121 4540033, located on Dudley Road Buses: 1, 9, 22, 23, 24, 29, 126, 128 Train: Nearest Station is New Street, about 1km away, 10 mins walk Pedestrians: Walking distance from The ICC, The NIA, The Bullring and New Street Station National Express: Digbeth Coach Station: 20 minute walk Opening Times: Friday and Saturday 19:00 - 00:00 Then after party till 04:00 Venue Capacity: 2400 For more information or to book tickets please call 08700 111 960

14

Image/photo

Booking




Starts:
Friday 3rd October, 2014 @ 8:30 PM


Location:

Jongleurs Birmingham, 259-262 Broad Street, Birmingham






Post
Foster's Comedy Live With Jeff Leach




Eat, Drink, Laugh and Dance at Jongleurs Birmingham.
Jeff Leach, Jonny Awsum, Paul Myrehaug, Geoff Norcott

Best arts and entertainment venue in Birmingham. Bar Risa and Jongleurs is a multi-functional entertainment venue consisting of 6 rooms and 7 bars, with a total capacity of 2400 people, making it one of the largest venues in Birmingham city. We offer a full range of entertainment, including Jongleurs comedy club with another 4 rooms, where you can relax at sunken tables in our Chill bar, dance to all that is retro in Rewind or hire your own stylish and sassy VIP area. We can cater for any event from company conferences to full party bookings; small and large groups can be accommodated with several rooms available to hire and private booths available in Rewind. We can provide anything from buffets to sit down dinners tailored to suit your budget and needs. The comedy is second to none and the venue provides a fantastic after party. Each week the club attracts thousands of people looking to make their night out just that little bit extra special. highlight runs every Friday and Saturday with an after party giving you access to the stylish bar located down stairs, Risa. The show can accommodate up to 400 guests each day. This is the flagship club and throughout the last 7 years has proven exactly why this is with numerous awards. Car: Nearest Carpark is NCP on Broad Street Taxi: Hayleys Cars _ 0121 4540033, located on Dudley Road Buses: 1, 9, 22, 23, 24, 29, 126, 128 Train: Nearest Station is New Street, about 1km away, 10 mins walk Pedestrians: Walking distance from The ICC, The NIA, The Bullring and New Street Station National Express: Digbeth Coach Station: 20 minute walk Opening Times: Friday and Saturday 19:00 - 00:00 Then after party till 04:00 Venue Capacity: 2400 For more information or to book tickets please call 08700 111 960 or email enquiries@jongleurs.com

GBP 14
Booking




Starts:
Friday 24th October, 2014 @ 8:30 PM


Location:

Jongleurs Birmingham,259-262 Broad Street,Birmingham,B1 2HF,United Kingdom






Post
Michael MD

/profile/michael_md

2 months ago
Jon Lawrence wrote the following post 12 hours ago:
New threat to Australian sovereignty in TPP negotiations
Certification Allows US Trade Negotiators to Rewrite TPP Copyright Rules
This article, by Jeremy Malcolm and Maira Sutton, was originally published in EFF's Deeplinks blog on 14th August 2014. See the original article.


Image: wikileaks.org

As the negotiations over the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement (TPP) continue to trudge along, little new information has leaked because the negotiations are being conducted under conditions of strict secrecy.

But this week, the launch of the TPP: No Certification website has shed new light on one issue that has been often overlooked before now. The United States, exclusively amongst the dozen negotiating partners, is reserving the right to vet other countries' implementation of the agreement before its own obligations come into effect. This has worrying implications for other countries planning to take advantage of whatever flexibilities remain in the TPP text after the negotiations are finished.

For example, the leaked draft of the TPP requires signatory countries to provide “legal incentives for service providers to cooperate with copyright owners.” Since “legal incentives” is so vague, there are several ways in which a country might interpret and implement this—a narrow interpretation might merely require Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to be offered a tax break for hosting anti-piracy banner ads, but if interpreted more broadly it might penalize ISPs millions of dollars unless they disconnect suspected infringers from the Internet.

Certification means that this ambiguity or flexibility could disappear, leaving countries with only one, extreme interpretation of their obligations under the TPP—whatever interpretation the US Trade Representative (USTR) unilaterally decides.

What Does Certification Mean?
Before the TPP becomes binding on any of the negotiating countries, they will each have to undergo a set of domestic procedures to approve the agreement. These vary from one country to another. For most countries, once this domestic approval process has taken place, this will activate its obligations towards all other countries that have undergone a similar approval process.

But only for the United States, its approval of the agreement will take place in two phases. First, Congress gives its overall approval of the TPP text, and second, the implementing laws of each of the other countries must be individually certified before the obligations of the US take effect for that country. This certification is not conducted by an independent body, but by the USTR, based on its own assessment of what was agreed—even if these supposed obligations were not reflected in the final text. Essentially, it's a way for the US to twist the arm of other nations until they enact policies it couldn't get them to agree to during negotiations.

How It Affects Copyright and Patent Laws
The threat of certification is not widely known in itself, but what has been even more obscure is one of the USTR's main motivations for toughening up certification requirements on its trading partners. Some of those partners have a record of passing more flexible copyright and patents laws than the US would like, so they use these certification powers to try to hold those nations ransom until they can get the policies that appease its domestic interests.

Chile, for example, entered into a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United States in 2004, but only in 2010 finalized a system for copyright content takedown. Under this system, unlike under the US DMCA, removal of content by intermediaries requires a court order in order to comply with Chile's constitution and its obligations under the American Convention on Human Rights.

The FTA permits this interpretation, but the USTR has strongly criticized it, urging Chile “to amend its Internet service provider liability regime to permit effective action against any act of infringement of copyright and related rights.” Chile remains on the Priority Watch List of the most recent Special 301 Report [pdf]published by the USTR, for this and other supposed deficiencies in its implementation of the FTA.

Australia provides another example. Australia, like the United States, is a signatory to the WIPO Copyright Treaty. Since 2000 it has had its own equivalent of the DMCA that implements that treaty—relevantly including a prohibition on the use of circumvention devices to bypass technological protection mechanisms (TPMs, also known as digital locks) that prevent digital works from being copied.

Following its conclusion of a trade deal with the United States in 2004, Australia was forced to amend this provision, to toughen it in several ways going beyond its WIPO obligations—including criminalising circumvention and criminalising trafficking in circumvention devices. Although the act of circumvention was subject to certain “fair use”-style exceptions, the supply of circumvention devices was criminalized outright. A subsequent Parliamentary Report [pdf]noted this as “a flaw that verges on absurdity,” rendering the circumvention exceptions “to be little more than empty promises.” Yet Australia was forced to agree to these absurd changes in order to satisfy US demands.

Certification and the TPP
The USTR has exercised this power for decades for other trade agreements, yet still, the consequences if it is applied to the TPP are difficult to predict and potentially serious. It would jeopardize the ability for other countries to make use of any positive concessions that they may have been able to negotiate in the TPP's copyright and patent text, that could allow their lawmakers to enact better policies that uphold the interests of users and consumers, or oftentimes, preserve such laws that are already in place.

With certification, the US can get away with not holding up their side of the deal as long as the US decides that other countries are not implementing the agreement to their liking. It is in other words, another stick that the USTR can use to force these countries into passing ever more senseless, draconian digital policies that go beyond the TPP's literal wording.

It's important to remember that the policies the USTR is forcing on to other countries are not representative of what the people in the US want, nor even reflective of the policies that are in place in the US. Certification is another way for the USTR to compel negotiating partners to enact policies that are harmful to users. It is reflective of how much Hollywood, major publishers, and other big corporate interests have captured the USTR's objectives.

The specter of the certification process sounds yet another note of caution for countries negotiating the TPP. They should be very wary in committing themselves to uphold such an agreement in circumstances where the flexibilities they believe they are agreeing to could actually be whittled away at the whim of one of their negotiating partners.

Conversely, if it seeks to gain the trust of both its partners and domestic stakeholders, US trade policy requires radical reform, not only to the flawed certification process, but also to the secrecy of trade negotiations in general, the lack of accountability to the public, and Fast Track proposals that insulate trade agreements even from the scrutiny of Congress itself.

Related Posts:



Civil Society Groups Oppose US and Australia's TPP Proposal…



An open letter from the Our Fair Deal Coalition to TPP trade



What Does Copyright Have to Do With 'Free Trade'?



Two big threats to Internet Freedom this week



New coalition to TPP negotiators: This is what a Fair Deal…


Post
LoveEvvnt

via Spraci Events

3 months ago
Birmingham! Foster's Comedy Live




Eat, Drink, Laugh and Dance at Jongleurs Birmingham.

Best arts and entertainment venue in Birmingham. Bar Risa and Jongleurs is a multi-functional entertainment venue consisting of 6 rooms and 7 bars, with a total capacity of 2400 people, making it one of the largest venues in Birmingham city. We offer a full range of entertainment, including Jongleurs comedy club with another 4 rooms, where you can relax at sunken tables in our Chill bar, dance to all that is retro in Rewind or hire your own stylish and sassy VIP area. We can cater for any event from company conferences to full party bookings; small and large groups can be accommodated with several rooms available to hire and private booths available in Rewind. We can provide anything from buffets to sit down dinners tailored to suit your budget and needs. The comedy is second to none and the venue provides a fantastic after party. Each week the club attracts thousands of people looking to make their night out just that little bit extra special. highlight runs every Friday and Saturday with an after party giving you access to the stylish bar located down stairs, Risa. The show can accommodate up to 400 guests each day. This is the flagship club and throughout the last 7 years has proven exactly why this is with numerous awards. Car: Nearest Carpark is NCP on Broad Street Taxi: Hayleys Cars _ 0121 4540033, located on Dudley Road Buses: 1, 9, 22, 23, 24, 29, 126, 128 Train: Nearest Station is New Street, about 1km away, 10 mins walk Pedestrians: Walking distance from The ICC, The NIA, The Bullring and New Street Station National Express: Digbeth Coach Station: 20 minute walk Opening Times: Friday and Saturday 19:00 - 00:00 Then after party till 04:00 Venue Capacity: 2400 For more information or to book tickets please call 08700 111 960 or email enquiries@jongleurs.com.

Artists / Speakers: Bennett Arron, Jimmy McGhie, Ian Coppinger, Tanyalee Davis.

See Website
Booking




Starts:
Thursday 4th December, 2014 @ 8:30 PM







Post
Fosters Comedy Live - 11




Eat, Drink, Laugh and Dance at Jongleurs Birmingham.
Live: Diane Spencer, Benny Boot, Mat Reed, Nathan Caton

Best arts and entertainment venue in Birmingham. Bar Risa and Jongleurs is a multi-functional entertainment venue consisting of 6 rooms and 7 bars, with a total capacity of 2400 people, making it one of the largest venues in Birmingham city. We offer a full range of entertainment, including Jongleurs comedy club with another 4 rooms, where you can relax at sunken tables in our Chill bar, dance to all that is retro in Rewind or hire your own stylish and sassy VIP area. We can cater for any event from company conferences to full party bookings; small and large groups can be accommodated with several rooms available to hire and private booths available in Rewind. We can provide anything from buffets to sit down dinners tailored to suit your budget and needs. The comedy is second to none and the venue provides a fantastic after party. Each week the club attracts thousands of people looking to make their night out just that little bit extra special. highlight runs every Friday and Saturday with an after party giving you access to the stylish bar located down stairs, Risa. The show can accommodate up to 400 guests each day. This is the flagship club and throughout the last 7 years has proven exactly why this is with numerous awards. Car: Nearest Carpark is NCP on Broad Street Taxi: Hayleys Cars _ 0121 4540033, located on Dudley Road Buses: 1, 9, 22, 23, 24, 29, 126, 128 Train: Nearest Station is New Street, about 1km away, 10 mins walk Pedestrians: Walking distance from The ICC, The NIA, The Bullring and New Street Station National Express: Digbeth Coach Station: 20 minute walk Opening Times: Friday and Saturday 19:00 - 00:00 Then after party till 04:00 Venue Capacity: 2400 For more information or to book tickets please call 08700 111 960 or email enquiries@jongleurs.com

£17
Booking




Starts:
Saturday 11th October, 2014 @ 8:30 PM


Location:

Jongleurs Birmingham, 259-262 Broad Street, Birmingham, B1 2HF, United Kingdom






Post
Foster's Comedy Live on Saturday September 20




Eat, Drink, Laugh and Dance at Jongleurs Birmingham.
Live: Windsor, Chris McCausland, Tez Ilyas, Felicity Ward

Best arts and entertainment venue in Birmingham. Bar Risa and Jongleurs is a multi functional entertainment venue consisting of 6 rooms and 7 bars, with a total capacity of 2400 people, making it one of the largest venues in Birmingham city. We offer a full range of entertainment, including Jongleurs comedy club with another 4 rooms, where you can relax at sunken tables in our Chill bar, dance to all that is retro in Rewind or hire your own stylish and sassy VIP area. We can cater for any event from company conferences to full party bookings small and large groups can be accommodated with several rooms available to hire and private booths available in Rewind. We can provide anything from buffets to sit down dinners tailored to suit your budget and needs. The comedy is second to none and the venue provides a fantastic after party. Each week the club attracts thousands of people looking to make their night out just that little bit extra special. highlight runs every Friday and Saturday with an after party giving you access to the stylish bar located down stairs, Risa. The show can accommodate up to 400 guests each day. This is the flagship club and throughout the last 7 years has proven exactly why this is with numerous awards. Car: Nearest Carpark is NCP on Broad Street Taxi: Hayleys Cars 0121 4540033, located on Dudley Road Buses: 1, 9, 22, 23, 24, 29, 126, 128 Train: Nearest Station is New Street, about 1km away, 10 mins walk Pedestrians: Walking distance from The ICC, The NIA, The Bullring and New Street Station National Express: Digbeth Coach Station: 20 minute walk Opening Times: Friday and Saturday 19:00 - 00:00 Then after party till 04:00 Venue Capacity: 2400 For more information or to book tickets please call 08700 111 960 or email enquiries@jongleurs.com

Ticket: GBP 17
Booking




Starts:
Saturday 20th September, 2014 @ 8:30 PM


Location:

Jongleurs Birmingham, 259-262 Broad Street, Birmingham






Post
Foster's Comedy Live With Barry Dodds




Eat, Drink, Laugh and Dance at Jongleurs Birmingham.
Barry Dodds, Babatunde, John Moloney

Best arts and entertainment venue in Birmingham. Bar Risa and Jongleurs is a multi-functional entertainment venue consisting of 6 rooms and 7 bars, with a total capacity of 2400 people, making it one of the largest venues in Birmingham city. We offer a full range of entertainment, including Jongleurs comedy club with another 4 rooms, where you can relax at sunken tables in our Chill bar, dance to all that is retro in Rewind or hire your own stylish and sassy VIP area. We can cater for any event from company conferences to full party bookings; small and large groups can be accommodated with several rooms available to hire and private booths available in Rewind. We can provide anything from buffets to sit down dinners tailored to suit your budget and needs. The comedy is second to none and the venue provides a fantastic after party. Each week the club attracts thousands of people looking to make their night out just that little bit extra special. highlight runs every Friday and Saturday with an after party giving you access to the stylish bar located down stairs, Risa. The show can accommodate up to 400 guests each day. This is the flagship club and throughout the last 7 years has proven exactly why this is with numerous awards. Car: Nearest Carpark is NCP on Broad Street Taxi: Hayleys Cars _ 0121 4540033, located on Dudley Road Buses: 1, 9, 22, 23, 24, 29, 126, 128 Train: Nearest Station is New Street, about 1km away, 10 mins walk Pedestrians: Walking distance from The ICC, The NIA, The Bullring and New Street Station National Express: Digbeth Coach Station: 20 minute walk Opening Times: Friday and Saturday 19:00 - 00:00 Then after party till 04:00 Venue Capacity: 2400 For more information or to book tickets please call 08700 111 960 or email enquiries@jongleurs.com

GBP 17
Booking




Starts:
Saturday 18th October, 2014 @ 8:30 PM


Location:

Jongleurs Birmingham,259-262 Broad Street,Birmingham,B1 2HF,United Kingdom






Post
Fosters Comedy Live 27th




Eat, Drink, Laugh and Dance at Jongleurs Birmingham.
Live: Mike Wilkinson, Dr George Ryegold, Jeff Innocent

Best arts and entertainment venue in Birmingham. Bar Risa and Jongleurs is a multi-functional entertainment venue consisting of 6 rooms and 7 bars, with a total capacity of 2400 people, making it one of the largest venues in Birmingham city. We offer a full range of entertainment, including Jongleurs comedy club with another 4 rooms, where you can relax at sunken tables in our Chill bar, dance to all that is retro in Rewind or hire your own stylish and sassy VIP area. We can cater for any event from company conferences to full party bookings; small and large groups can be accommodated with several rooms available to hire and private booths available in Rewind. We can provide anything from buffets to sit down dinners tailored to suit your budget and needs. The comedy is second to none and the venue provides a fantastic after party. Each week the club attracts thousands of people looking to make their night out just that little bit extra special. highlight runs every Friday and Saturday with an after party giving you access to the stylish bar located down stairs, Risa. The show can accommodate up to 400 guests each day. This is the flagship club and throughout the last 7 years has proven exactly why this is with numerous awards.

Car: Nearest Carpark is NCP on Broad Street Taxi: Hayleys Cars _ 0121 4540033, located on Dudley Road Buses: 1, 9, 22, 23, 24, 29, 126, 128 Train: Nearest Station is New Street, about 1km away, 10 mins walk Pedestrians: Walking distance from The ICC, The NIA, The Bullring and New Street Station National Express: Digbeth Coach Station: 20 minute walk Opening Times: Friday and Saturday 19:00 - 00:00 Then after party till 04:00 Venue Capacity: 2400 For more information or to book tickets please call 08700 111 960

17

Image/photo

Booking




Starts:
Saturday 27th September, 2014 @ 8:30 PM


Location:

Jongleurs Birmingham, 259-262 Broad Street, Birmingham






Post
Foster's Comedy Live: 25th October




Eat, Drink, Laugh and Dance at Jongleurs Birmingham.
Live: Jeff Leach, Jonny Awsum, Paul Myrehaug, Geoff Norcott

Best arts and entertainment venue in Birmingham. Bar Risa and Jongleurs is a multi-functional entertainment venue consisting of 6 rooms and 7 bars, with a total capacity of 2400 people, making it one of the largest venues in Birmingham city. We offer a full range of entertainment, including Jongleurs comedy club with another 4 rooms, where you can relax at sunken tables in our Chill bar, dance to all that is retro in Rewind or hire your own stylish and sassy VIP area. We can cater for any event from company conferences to full party bookings; small and large groups can be accommodated with several rooms available to hire and private booths available in Rewind. We can provide anything from buffets to sit down dinners tailored to suit your budget and needs. The comedy is second to none and the venue provides a fantastic after party. Each week the club attracts thousands of people looking to make their night out just that little bit extra special. highlight runs every Friday and Saturday with an after party giving you access to the stylish bar located down stairs, Risa. The show can accommodate up to 400 guests each day. This is the flagship club and throughout the last 7 years has proven exactly why this is with numerous awards. Car: Nearest Carpark is NCP on Broad Street Taxi: Hayleys Cars _ 0121 4540033, located on Dudley Road Buses: 1, 9, 22, 23, 24, 29, 126, 128 Train: Nearest Station is New Street, about 1km away, 10 mins walk Pedestrians: Walking distance from The ICC, The NIA, The Bullring and New Street Station National Express: Digbeth Coach Station: 20 minute walk Opening Times: Friday and Saturday 19:00 - 00:00 Then after party till 04:00 Venue Capacity: 2400 For more information or to book tickets please call 08700 111 960 or email enquiries@jongleurs.com

£17
Booking




Starts:
Saturday 25th October, 2014 @ 8:30 PM


Location:

Jongleurs Birmingham, 259-262 Broad Street, Birmingham, B1 2HF, United Kingdom






Post
CoinDesk

via Diaspora

6 days ago
[Practical Sessions and In-Depth Talks Mark Final Day of Hashers United](http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/CoinDesk/~3/eLZM__VGRbk/)

### [Practical Sessions and In-Depth Talks Mark Final Day of Hashers United](http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/CoinDesk/~3/eLZM__VGRbk/)
*Tue, 14 Oct 2014 13:01:00 +0000, by Stan Higgins*

Day two of the Hashers United Las Vegas bitcoin mining convention featuredboth practical and conceptual seminars.

_ _ _


Published via [PaperboD*](http://paperbod.com)


Event
VO Atlanta 2015
Thursday 12th March 2015 - Sunday 15th March 2015
HILTON Atlanta Airport 1031 Virginia Avenue, Atlanta, GA 30354
VO Atlanta is the largest voiceover conference on the east coast. The conference attracts attendees from all areas of the voiceover industry and those interested in getting involved in the voiceover industry. Built around the idea of a strong community, VO Atlanta provides a great opportunity to connect with others in the voiceover industry. The conference is an annual event held in Atlanta, Georgia during the month of March.


Event
Wellness Expo in Addison
Saturday 11th April 2015
15650 Addison Rd, Addison, TX 75001
Planet earth's best-loved wellness event. Over 100 exhibitors featuring products and services for mind, body and spirit. Shop for energized jewelry & stones, experience bodywork, Reiki, reflexology & intuitive readings. Lecture series includes talks on "Healing with Sound", "Astrology and You", and "Five Healing Stones". Saturday & Sunday, April 11-12, 11am - 6pm. Addison Conference Centre, 15650 Addison Road. Admission $7, children under 12 and adults over 65 are free. Details 972-925-9393. For complete speaker schedule see WellnessExpo.net


Event
The Anti Ageing Health and Beauty Show Manchester
Saturday 8th November 2014
Event City, Peel Dome, The Trafford Centre, Manchester, M17 8PL, United Kingdom
Look & feel fantastic with the latest anti-ageing treatments

* Discover innovative skincare products to help you look younger

* Sample exciting new beauty treatments & make up

* See live demonstrations of cutting-edge procedures.

* Hear presenter Lizzie Cundy share celebrity beauty secrets

* Explore a new alternative to Botox called Frotox, a treatment that promises to put your wrinkles in a deep freeze

* Learn about organic treatments, facial yoga & treat yourself to an acupuncture facelift

* Meet experts & gain advice on the right treatments for you

* Get makeover tips from leading hairstylists, make-up artists & beauticians

Our experts in health and nutrition, cosmetic treatments and skincare will be on hand to help you look and feel fantastic. And how about some retail therapy? Spoil yourself with our fantastic show offers on lovely niche skincare products, buy an age defying home laser or try a collagen boosting health drink. Visit our exciting demo stage to find out how you can freeze unwanted fat, tighten your skin, exercise your facial muscles and so much more...

Tickets: http://atnd.it/15536-1

Map


Event
[Optimism Grows as Isle of Man Bitcoin Conference Draws to Close](http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/CoinDesk/~3/PFgYCYU9_cg/)

### [Optimism Grows as Isle of Man Bitcoin Conference Draws to Close](http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/CoinDesk/~3/PFgYCYU9_cg/)
*Thu, 18 Sep 2014 20:25:12 +0000, by Joon Ian Wong*

Day two of the Crypto Valley Summit on the Isle of Man saw companies showcasedand big possibilities discussed.

_ _ _


Published via [PaperboD*](http://paperbod.com)


Event
This Feeling presents: The Libertines After Zone
Saturday 5th July 2014
Bloomsbury Lanes, Basement of Tavistock Hotel, Bedford Way, London, WC1H 9EU, UK
The UK's most rock 'n' roll night out. A well known haunt of well known faces, and where to see future next big things in advance.

The Enemy

The Enemy's debut album We'll Live and Die in These Towns (2007) went straight to Number 1 in the UK Albums chart on release. Their second album Music for the People (2008) went to Number 2 on the UK Albums chart. Streets in the Sky, their third studio album, was released on 21 May 2012 and was also their third UK top 10 album.

TF PLAYS>>>

Kasabian / Doves / Eugene McGuinness / Peace / Courteeners / The Coral / Stone Roses / Oasis / Miles Kane / Noel Gallagher / Swim Deep / The Rifles / Palma Violets / The Twang / The Jam / Paul Weller / The Beatles / The Who / The Happy Mondays / The Enemy / The Music / The View / The Vaccines / Cast / Verve / Shed 7 / The Strokes / plus loads more inc. the best new bands and old classics

DJ's till 3am. £4 advanced tickets available now.

ADV TIX & INFO @ www.thisfeeling.co.uk/club

Category: Nightlife

Prices: Advance £4,Door GBP £5


Post
MozFest London 2013
So I made it down to Ravensbourne for MozFest Opening night, it was set-up like a mini maker faire across two floors. There was tables laid out with different hacks, displays and information about the companies/people/technologies that will be showcased and played with during the festival. Mozilla also provided nibbles and drinks for the evening which was a great touch after a long train ride from Glasgow.

If you have never been to a Moz Fest I can give you a quick run down? it started life as Drum fest in Barcelona 2010 is the earliest I was involved? Mozilla then found the awesome venue of Ravensbourne in North Greenwich (London) where it has had its home since? There are plenty of stairs to climb overall 9 floors full of different hacker spaces, talks, workshops? Each space has its own theme so it is easy enough for you to head to a theme of your liking and from there discover some awesome going ons. I say this because navigating the schedule can become overwhelming. With so many tracks and so many very cool discussions and workshops on it gets hard to try to plan and then stick to that plan at MozFest.

The first day (Saturday) started off slightly late
Image/photo
as all good conferences lol, and included some great introductions to the weekend and themes. I headed up to the Open BAdges area for the majority of Saturday. I have written up a seperate blog post about Open Badges and the resources I discovered. It was a great day and well worth the trip, we listend to people discuss real life cases on how they were implementing different Mozilla technologies and also some hands on practicals. There was a great Open Badges workshop

After a full day of amazing technologies and information overload we headed over into the O2 for some drinks at Alphabet City. I stayed for a drink or two but after a long day and another one to come I ended up heading to bed early.

The second day was ran pretty much the same as the first some morning talks on the main stage and then break off into open hack and talk sessions. I spent some of my time in the open badges but also wondered around seeing what else was on display and dropping in on a talk here and there. At the end of the day one of the final talks was from the guatdian journalists about the NSA Snowden papers which was quite interesting as one could imagine.

The final maker faire was awesome, people where showing off things that where made during their workshops over the weekend. It was awesome to see so many differnent types of technlogies on display and also alot of hand made things on display and an emotion game which involved string and paper and well maniquens
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It was overall an amazing weekend and I am still overloaded with information and working hard to get it all out and make sure I share links to the amazing resources and people I was able to meet.


Post
Linux Con Europe – Edinburgh 2013
I must start by saying a big thank you o Linux Foundation who gave me a free ticket after I won a competition over twitter. I was offered my choice of tickets and I chose Europe as I could see good friends in Scotland, visit Edinburgh where I have lived before and it lined up with MozFest which I was wanting to go to. Linux Con Europe Edinburgh 21 -23

I ended up taking a student friend of mine from Glasgow it was his first Linux Con too. I have been to LinuxConf Australia before but this is different. It was my first time seeing Linux talk on stage aswell as normally I just see him walking around LinuxConf au
Image/photo

The conference was fantastic three days of awesomeness and there was way too much information to take in. The first night there was networking drinks in the exhibitor?s booth display area. This was good as it made you actually get around and see some of the booths and technologies on show. Oh course to collect stickers and a really cool black duck rubber ducky.

Also found myself bumping into quite a few Australians who were there on work related trips. It was nice to see a lot of familiar faces around the conference and as always great to catch up with friends.

The Tuesday morning on the second day there was a Women in Linux breakfast which was fantastic. I did not realise just how many Linux Kernel developers there were at the conference, for me it was a bigger number then I had seen before I counted over 18 and whilst small for me that is a large number I was very impressed by their stories. When it came to my turn to share my story I think I was still in awe lol It was a great breakfast and saw some old faces there which is always nice. We all discussed what we did and who we were and then chatted whilst eating a very yummy breakfast sponsored by Linux Foundation.

The second night we were lucky enough to have a special guest invitation to the VIP party. This was held in the old Ghillie Dhu in Edinburgh NewTown. This was amazing the food was fantastic three courses of sheer delight and a good choice of ale and larger.

The third day was fanastic there was the keynote discussion with Linus on the state of the Linux Kernel which was everything from community management questions to kernel ones. There was also a talk by Mikko Hypponen on ?the surveillance state? which was thought provoking and fantastic to say the least. I also managed to get a talk in every session on the Wednesday which was great, my two favourites where probably ?What?s coming up in the Kernel? and ?Apache 2.4 changes? these two where ones that I took the most out of for my work and play. I was excited to hear about the possibility of page_size changes in newer kernels, major win for memory management there. Also the fact that in Apache 2.4 apart from removing a lot of legacy code they made mod_rewrite human eligible
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this means that regular expressions are no longer needed when writing rules. I also enjoyes Sarah's panel discussion where she presented winners from the FOSS outreach program for Women . This was interesting to hear there stories also because they where so different and all jumped onto kernel development only one had prior experience with kernel development. It surely did make me leave the talk going if I had access to a mentor I could also contribute code to the kernel and this program is not just goof for graduates but also old timers like me
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lol never to old to learn to contribute to the kernel.

The final night sadly ended with drinks and nibbles inside the Scottish Natural Museum. Where we had some of the exhibitions opened for us to walk around in. There was also the Technical Advisory Board voting which occurred for the foundation. It was fantastic to be able to take part in this event as you need to be present to vote and this was my first time I could be physically present.

All and all this was a fantastic event and I look forward to being able to come to another Linux Con. For students with the reduced ticket price I would recommended my friend got a lot out of it and also discussed the possibility of a new role
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and thanks Linux Foundation for your on-going support of Linux based industry and events.


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Angela Daly

feeds.efa.org.au/ElectronicFrontiersAustralia

1 month ago
#5 Safeguards for International Cooperation. Extraterritorial Application of Human Rights Law
This is a guest post from Angela Daly & Angus Murray, Members of the EFA Policy and research Standing Committee. Angela is also a member of Australian Privacy Foundation's board of directors.

Between 15th-19th of September, in the week leading up the first year anniversary of the 13 Necessary and Proportionate Principles, EFA and the coalition behind the Principles will be conducting a Week of Action explaining some of the key guiding principles for surveillance law reform. Every day, we'll take on a different part of the principles, exploring what’s at stake and what we need to do to bring intelligence agencies and the police back under the rule of law. You can read the complete set of posts at: https://necessaryandproportionate.org/anniversary. The Principles were first launched at the 24th Session of the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva on 20 September 2013. Let's send a message to Member States at the United Nations and wherever else folks are tackling surveillance law reform: surveillance law can no longer ignore our human rights. Follow our discussion on twitter with the hashtag: #privacyisaright

“While Australia shirks its international obligations, Australians wait on the rest of the world to act”

One of the most important treaties of international human rights law is the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) which has been signed and ratified by most of the world’s countries. Contained within the rights and liberties set out in this treaty are the right to free expression (Art 19) and the right to privacy (Art 17). Although all of these countries have signed and ratified the ICCPR, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States have exhibited blatant disregard for the rights contained therein by forming the Five Eyes (FVEY) coalition of countries which engage in mass surveillance of their populations. The ‘above the law’ existence of FVEY was only brought to the public’s attention as a result of Edward Snowden’s leaked documents, and was revealed to be fundamentally at odds with international human rights principles.

Indeed, this lack of compliance with human rights has resulted in various legal challenges to the FVEY activity. One of these challenges has been spearheaded by advocacy group Privacy International, which has been tackling the UK arm of FVEY. Initially attempts to compel the release of information relating to the scope and powers of FVEY via Freedom of Information requests to Government Communications HQ (GCHQ) were denied. Now Privacy International has brought a claim before the European Court of Human Rights. The essence of this claim is that the refusal to release this information is a violation of free expression as enshrined in Art 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights. The lack of public information about the exact nature of the FVEY partnership, given its impact on the rights to free expression and privacy of millions of people throughout the world, ought to be of grave concern to all.

We in Australia are watching these developments overseas with great interest, particularly given the lack of means at our disposal to challenge aspects of FVEY and/or Australia’s very participation in the partnership and disregard for its international obligations. Australians suffer from a lack of enforceable human rights compared to citizens of the other FVEY countries. While the ICCPR has been signed and ratified by Australia, the rights it contains are, on the whole, not actionable in national law. At the domestic level, Australia does have a written Constitution, but no comprehensive bill of rights. A weak right to political communication has been implied into the Constitution by the Australian courts, but its scope is very limited, and there remains no enforceable right to privacy.

So as Australians we are left to watch developments in other FVEY countries, and hope that these challenges to mass surveillance and aspects thereof are successful. Any striking down of the FVEY partnership by courts in other countries could possibly have spillover effects for Australians and their free expression and privacy rights. Thus they may cause the rights recognised in these other countries’ legal systems to have some positive extraterritorial reach in Australia.

However, the fact remains that despite our country being an enthusiastic participant in FVEY’s mass surveillance activities and shirking from its international human rights obligations, we are disadvantaged compared to citizens of the other FVEY countries in our scant rights protection and must await developments in other parts of the world rather than be able to hold the Australian government to account for violations of our human rights.

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Jon Lawrence

feeds.efa.org.au/ElectronicFrontiersAustralia

2 months ago
New threat to Australian sovereignty in TPP negotiations
Certification Allows US Trade Negotiators to Rewrite TPP Copyright Rules
This article, by Jeremy Malcolm and Maira Sutton, was originally published in EFF's Deeplinks blog on 14th August 2014. See the original article.


Image: wikileaks.org

As the negotiations over the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement (TPP) continue to trudge along, little new information has leaked because the negotiations are being conducted under conditions of strict secrecy.

But this week, the launch of the TPP: No Certification website has shed new light on one issue that has been often overlooked before now. The United States, exclusively amongst the dozen negotiating partners, is reserving the right to vet other countries' implementation of the agreement before its own obligations come into effect. This has worrying implications for other countries planning to take advantage of whatever flexibilities remain in the TPP text after the negotiations are finished.

For example, the leaked draft of the TPP requires signatory countries to provide “legal incentives for service providers to cooperate with copyright owners.” Since “legal incentives” is so vague, there are several ways in which a country might interpret and implement this—a narrow interpretation might merely require Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to be offered a tax break for hosting anti-piracy banner ads, but if interpreted more broadly it might penalize ISPs millions of dollars unless they disconnect suspected infringers from the Internet.

Certification means that this ambiguity or flexibility could disappear, leaving countries with only one, extreme interpretation of their obligations under the TPP—whatever interpretation the US Trade Representative (USTR) unilaterally decides.

What Does Certification Mean?
Before the TPP becomes binding on any of the negotiating countries, they will each have to undergo a set of domestic procedures to approve the agreement. These vary from one country to another. For most countries, once this domestic approval process has taken place, this will activate its obligations towards all other countries that have undergone a similar approval process.

But only for the United States, its approval of the agreement will take place in two phases. First, Congress gives its overall approval of the TPP text, and second, the implementing laws of each of the other countries must be individually certified before the obligations of the US take effect for that country. This certification is not conducted by an independent body, but by the USTR, based on its own assessment of what was agreed—even if these supposed obligations were not reflected in the final text. Essentially, it's a way for the US to twist the arm of other nations until they enact policies it couldn't get them to agree to during negotiations.

How It Affects Copyright and Patent Laws
The threat of certification is not widely known in itself, but what has been even more obscure is one of the USTR's main motivations for toughening up certification requirements on its trading partners. Some of those partners have a record of passing more flexible copyright and patents laws than the US would like, so they use these certification powers to try to hold those nations ransom until they can get the policies that appease its domestic interests.

Chile, for example, entered into a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United States in 2004, but only in 2010 finalized a system for copyright content takedown. Under this system, unlike under the US DMCA, removal of content by intermediaries requires a court order in order to comply with Chile's constitution and its obligations under the American Convention on Human Rights.

The FTA permits this interpretation, but the USTR has strongly criticized it, urging Chile “to amend its Internet service provider liability regime to permit effective action against any act of infringement of copyright and related rights.” Chile remains on the Priority Watch List of the most recent Special 301 Report [pdf]published by the USTR, for this and other supposed deficiencies in its implementation of the FTA.

Australia provides another example. Australia, like the United States, is a signatory to the WIPO Copyright Treaty. Since 2000 it has had its own equivalent of the DMCA that implements that treaty—relevantly including a prohibition on the use of circumvention devices to bypass technological protection mechanisms (TPMs, also known as digital locks) that prevent digital works from being copied.

Following its conclusion of a trade deal with the United States in 2004, Australia was forced to amend this provision, to toughen it in several ways going beyond its WIPO obligations—including criminalising circumvention and criminalising trafficking in circumvention devices. Although the act of circumvention was subject to certain “fair use”-style exceptions, the supply of circumvention devices was criminalized outright. A subsequent Parliamentary Report [pdf]noted this as “a flaw that verges on absurdity,” rendering the circumvention exceptions “to be little more than empty promises.” Yet Australia was forced to agree to these absurd changes in order to satisfy US demands.

Certification and the TPP
The USTR has exercised this power for decades for other trade agreements, yet still, the consequences if it is applied to the TPP are difficult to predict and potentially serious. It would jeopardize the ability for other countries to make use of any positive concessions that they may have been able to negotiate in the TPP's copyright and patent text, that could allow their lawmakers to enact better policies that uphold the interests of users and consumers, or oftentimes, preserve such laws that are already in place.

With certification, the US can get away with not holding up their side of the deal as long as the US decides that other countries are not implementing the agreement to their liking. It is in other words, another stick that the USTR can use to force these countries into passing ever more senseless, draconian digital policies that go beyond the TPP's literal wording.

It's important to remember that the policies the USTR is forcing on to other countries are not representative of what the people in the US want, nor even reflective of the policies that are in place in the US. Certification is another way for the USTR to compel negotiating partners to enact policies that are harmful to users. It is reflective of how much Hollywood, major publishers, and other big corporate interests have captured the USTR's objectives.

The specter of the certification process sounds yet another note of caution for countries negotiating the TPP. They should be very wary in committing themselves to uphold such an agreement in circumstances where the flexibilities they believe they are agreeing to could actually be whittled away at the whim of one of their negotiating partners.

Conversely, if it seeks to gain the trust of both its partners and domestic stakeholders, US trade policy requires radical reform, not only to the flawed certification process, but also to the secrecy of trade negotiations in general, the lack of accountability to the public, and Fast Track proposals that insulate trade agreements even from the scrutiny of Congress itself.

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